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Millennials + Parents = Parennials

The YoMummy Parennials Blog by Denise Reardon – Early Years Expert and Author

I created this blog in order to offer threads of thinking about the trials and tribulations of becoming and being a ‘good enough’ parent and share with you my many years’ experience of working with and researching global early years experts. The term ‘Parennials’ refers to all expectant and post-natal parents, whether you are going it alone, in a same sex couple, surrogacy, or in a male and female partnership.

Today’s blog invites Parennials to put themselves into the shoes or should I say baby booties of their little one.

In contrast to taking a driving test there isn’t a ‘Parennial Test’. Anyone good or bad can make a baby but it is the way that you stand up to your responsibilities that makes all the difference. By putting yourself into the baby- booties of your teeny tiny foetus, new-born, toddler or kid, consider ‘being done to as you would like to be done to ’ in terms of their:

  • physical
  • intellectual
  • behavioural
  • emotional
  • language
  • wellbeing
  • social development

As your child develops you must support them to learn across each of these areas at the same time. A baby learns to suckle milk (physical); learns to articulate sound (intellectual); respond to others (social); express feelings (emotional) and in time, learn the difference between right and wrong (behavioural).

Aside from your child’s genetic predispositions, at birth the average baby’s brain is about a quarter of the size of the average adult brain. Even more amazing the average baby’s brain doubles in size during its first year and will become about 80% of an adult sized brain by the time they reach the age of 3. Your child’s brain will be almost fully grown by age 5. Neuroscientists believe that high quality social and cultural experiences are critical in the early years of a child’s life not only to for healthy brains but also for a well-rounded personality. Find out more about ‘lighting up’ your little one’s brain in the Save the Children ‘How parents, carers and nurseries support children’s brain development in the first five years’

On that note, I leave you to contemplate on what you need to find out about, bearing in mind that as soon as your little one is born their brain and their all-round development expands daily and before you know it the teeny tiny cuddly baby you gave birth to is ready to explore the world through their senses. As my blog develops I will take each aspect a child’s development and provide pointers gleaned from the world of early years experts and parents to help you give your teeny tiny foetus, new-born, toddler or kid a good enough start in life.

It’s always best to be one chapter ahead! If the idea of being a Parennial without some guidance seems daunting, take a look at Amazon’s babies and toddler’s bestseller list on Amazon, however a word of caution, read the reviews carefully before selecting your bedtime reading!

Read regular updates on the YoMummy ‘Parennial Blog’, where I will be offering advice, guidance, sign-posts and useful information on all aspects of becoming and being a Parennial.

Denise Reardon: Early Years Expert and Author

Early Years Teaching and Learning (2018) by Denise Reardon et al. available clicking here.